Growing Gifts
When it comes to spring and summer holidays, turn over a new leaf this year by giving a personality-perfect houseplant.

Growing Gifts

A houseplant given as a present will flourish long after the holiday. With Mother’s Day and Father’s Day approaching, we wanted to show you how giving a plant can be as unique as the person you’re gifting it to. Plus, the benefits of having houseplants range from air-purifying qualities to cute conversation pieces. 

“If the person loves plants, maybe try for something unusual. But if it’s someone that’s kind of new to plants, give them something a little easier to care for,” said Cindy Carlson of Aberdeen Floral.

Cindy also recommended including a card with good directions for watering the plant and keeping it in the right amount of sunlight.

Pam Teigen at Lily’s Floral Design and Gifts suggested blooming plants. She said, “I think it makes people feel happy to receive some beautiful spring flowers and feel like spring is really here.” 

Read on for more hints about matching your loved ones’ personalities with the right plant. Dana Althoff, retail operations manager at Parkview Nursery, showed us around the greenhouse and gave us more expert advice on caring for each of the varieties listed here. //


For The Foodie

For the mom or dad who won’t get out of the kitchen, offer the gift of fresh herbs. They’ll smile at their delicately plated soup and rave about the fresh taste in their spaghetti.

Basil

Grow this herb in a planter, exposed to at least six hours of sunlight with regular waterings. The trick is to regularly pinch the stem to remove the more fully grown leaves for a fresh taste to tonight’s dinner. As a gift, it’s great to give this in a set with similar flavors like oregano and thyme.

Basil


For The Forgetful Friend

Wait — I have to water this? Most people love the look of a chic houseplant but can’t level up to the care they require. These plant gifts won’t die, no matter how many times your friend forgets to water them.

ZZ Plant

The Zamioculcas Zamiifolia isn’t sleeping on the job. An easy-care plant, this spiky version is good for even the most forgetful gardeners. Let the soil dry out between each watering and set it in indirect, low sunlight. The plant brightens up a dorm room or restroom, but be careful that no one eats it because it’s poisonous.

Snake Plant

The Sansevieria Zeylanica is a well-known oxygen purifier that can be watered once a month. Kept in low light, this plant will thrive even if you forget it’s there. As a tease, consider giving it to your mother-in-law this Mother’s Day since it’s also nicknamed Mother-In-Law Tongue.

  ZZ Plant

Snake Plant


For The Plant Parent

As holidays celebrating the people who raised us near, pick up a prehistoric plant that requires medium-level care. This one’s for those longstanding, deep-rooted relationships.

Sago Palm

Dinosaur fans will love this small houseplant that’s been found in fossils. While it requires low moisture, it needs medium sunlight. To achieve this balance, consider leaving the pot outside in the summertime. A new row of fronds should grow back each year, so this makes a great long-term greenery.

Sago Palm


For The Green Thumb

This family member’s outdoor garden looks like a heavenly oasis. From watermelon to orchids, they can grow anything with a little dirt and a lot of heart. Give this person a challenge with a more picky houseplant.

Croton

Any variety of this houseplant is sure to wow avid gardeners. The colorful plant is picky about watering — overwatering and too much drying could make the leaves fall out. The pros receiving this should give it bright light and plenty of TLC. Intermediate to advanced level skill is best for the ones taking in a beautiful Croton.

Croton


For The Social Media Guru

Let’s be honest, this friend is just looking for a cute Instagram post. Give them something to post about with either of these trendy varieties. Other great ways to give these are in fairy gardens, wall hangers, or as sets.

String of Pearls Succulent

The social media craze made these easy-care plants popular. Their shallow roots and little thirst mean they’ll grow in the smallest, sweetest pots. To figure out if yours is thriving, look for the split lines on each little ball and definitely don’t overwater them.

Ruffled Red Echeveria

This succulent can get big. Echeveria is the type for your friend who wants to fill a corner with a plant requiring less daily care. Keep repotting bigger, and in a couple of years, this baby plant will graduate into a full-blown adult.

  String of Pearls Succulent

Ruffled Red Echeveria